Classical Liberalism and the Rule of Law

The history of liberty and prosperity is inseparable from the practice of free enterprise and respect for the rule of law. Both are products of the spirit of classical liberalism. But a correct understanding of free enterprise, the rule of law, and liberalism (rightly understood) is greatly lacking in the world today.   Historically, liberalism…

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Culture Wars and Immigration

A common objection to immigration in the 21st century is an appeal to the protection of national culture. Letting more immigrants into a country, according to the cultural objection, would have the undesired effect of changing the cultural landscape and social customs of the destination country.   Consider the rhetoric of the most high‐​profile and outspoken…

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How “Capitalism” Became a Dirty Word

What does “capitalism” really mean?   The word “capitalism” carries a lot of baggage. It is a word many people try to avoid using when extolling the virtues and achievements of the free enterprise system. To understand this, we must look briefly at its historical origins.   Karl Marx Started It    It was in…

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FDR’s “Four Freedoms” and the Evolution of Freedom

One of the most impactful speeches in American history has just passed its 80th anniversary—Franklin Roosevelt’s famous 1941 “Four Freedoms” speech.   The speech introduced cognitive dissonance into Americans’ understanding of freedom that is still cited today as justification for expanding government power over citizens’ lives. If we want to advance our “General Welfare,” as…

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True Liberalism is about Human Compassion

The first job in that task, I would argue, is for the true liberal is to reassert the fundamental liberal nature of true liberal radicalism to both friends and critics.   Samuel Freedman published a subtle and sophisticated philosophical reflection on “Illiberal Libertarians” (2001), but his basic point was raised in a more popular treatment…

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Literature and Economics: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

Abstract It is often said that literature and economics are different disciplines, and never shall the twain meet. However, the theme of money has arrested and animated the imagination of writers since time immemorial. The converse is also true, with economists like Adam Smith deploying literary techniques in his magnum opus, The Wealth of Nations.…

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